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Save As Draft and Drafts indicator

When you compose an email, it's not clear how save this as draft. Sometimes when you press the X it means "save as draft" and sometimes it means "close".

 

And when you have drafts, it would be great if you have some kind of indicator that there are drafts. Drafts often means that they are not sent and you have to take action on it.

  • Guest
  • Oct 26 2018
  • Needs review
  • Attach files
  • Guest commented
    16 Apr 04:16pm

    My biggest complaint about Verse is that I tend to forget about draft messages. I'm part-way through composing a message and I get interrupted, any number of times by any number of things. My draft disappears in the chaos. A day later - or a week or a month later - I look in my Drafts view and see that I never completed and sent the draft. Bummer!

    I wish Verse would help me to keep track of unsent messages. For example, a nice feature of, ahem, Outlook mail is that if I have drafted but not sent a reply to a message in my Inbox, the word [Draft] appears (yes, in red) as the first word in the Subject column in the Inbox view.

    Other ideas: Pop a warning that I have n unsent messages when I try to close the Verse tab or when so many minutes (definable by me, preferably) have passed since I last looked at or edited a given draft. Maybe I could also turn off the warning for drafts I'm not ready to send, or ask that I be warned in n hours or days instead of n minutes.